Morro Bay man finishes cross-country ride (on esk8) — and the Smithsonian gets his skateboard

You are one lucky dude! Sounds like she enjoyed herself, in her own way. Thanks for sharing.

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You Sir are my hero! As a 43 year old that never wants to give up skateboarding, your story is seriously inspirational. Thank you.

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Now I’m imagining a week long Renegade event. I wonder how many states we can make it through in a week

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Take some serious riding to make it out of Cali in a week.

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Thanks Adam! If you’re ever near Morro Bay, California stop by the Morro Bay Skateboard Museum and I’ll give you a private tour, then we’ll go for a ride!

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Thanks…stoked to be here!

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Skunk…tell me more!

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its a five day event which will include racing, meeting people, and we will do group rides at night through the city. Would love it you joined us!

more info here!

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I’d love that and will take you up on it. My son actually goes to school at Cal Poly.

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Hey Hummie, “thisguyhere” nailed it I had three Inboard M1s. Each one ended up being ridden about 900 miles. No braking? I think you are asking if any of them broke…only changed one wheel the entire ride and only had one overheat warning.

thisguyhere - sorry for the late reply. Thanks for the welcome. I would do it again in heartbeat!

Yep, Inboard supplied three M1s, 15 batteries and 4 chargers,

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Wow what a grammatical blunder! Yea that’s what meant.

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Hi Pedrodemio - Thanks for following us! We had three interactions with the police/highway patrol. All of them were extremely positive. All were just interested in what we were up to. Two of them stopped to check on my wife as she was waiting in the support vehicle, and then ended up waiting with her until I arrived.
Had two officers in Iowa help us get over the bridge that spans the Mississippi river.

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Probably helps that you’re 62 and not 26. :wink:

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You may have a point. Though it’s interesting, on my four pushes across America, I think we had less than 10 encounters with the police, only three were negative, two of them by the same guy…eight years apart (1976 and 1984 in Wisconsin). In 1976 were all 19.
Not sure if I posted this previously, here’s a link to an short film about the first ride.
Beyond the Sidewalk

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That’s the goal then, first one outta Cali wins

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lol all I can think about is how much it must have sucked to ride the whole way swapping batteries every 5-7 miles :rofl:

You know what would suck even more? Pushing the entire way. On a short board. In 1976. Then 3 more times later. :exploding_head: We’re so spoiled. Check out the video Jack posted above. That took some serious dedication. Amazing.

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@OldSkateGuy how did you manage to avoid busy highways? Was there any areas that you had to drive due to un-skateable / too dangerous?

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@Irdesigns - I have pushed across America four times, so I’ve gotten fairly good at route planning. The route I used for the e-board crossing was a hybrid of the routes I had used before. Out west I was mainly on secondary highways, there aren’t a lot of choices in states like Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming and Nebraska. I avoided four lane highways as if they were the plague! From eastern Nebraska onward I was able to utilize a lot of county roads, usually these are in decent condition and have very little traffic. I also made use of “rails to trails” bike paths whenever I could. My favorite was the Great Allegheny Passage between McKeesport, Pennsylvania and Cumberland, Maryland, about 130 miles of crushed limestone…and no cars!

There were a few bridges that were too unsafe to ride over, we also hit a seven mile section of dirt road on the very eastern side of Nebraska, with no alternative available we drove that section.

Riding through large cities was my least favorite, unless I could find a bike path such as I did in Des Moines, Iowa and Washington DC. Funny story, I got lost in Des Moines when the bike path ended, and since I don’t like looking at my phone or wearing earbuds while riding, I called my friend and 1984 cross country teammate, Gary Fluitt, who was following me via “location sharing” on Google maps. I held the phone to my ear as he gave me turn by turn instructions until I got back on the bike path.

Every night we would let Gary know our ending location and where we wanted to get to the next day. He would then look at our pre-planned route on Google maps and also Google Earth and send us a link the next morning with any changes he thought were needed.

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